Archive for the ‘Handy hints and tips’ category

The Trick to Getting Things Done!

May 21, 2014

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Research shows that about 20 per cent of adults are chronic procrastinators. Despite all the proven benefits of being productive, many of us tend to put off until tomorrow what we need and even want to do today. Yet, what we don’t realise is that it’s undermining our happiness. It stresses us out and prevents us from reaching our goals in life. Studies suggest that procrastinators tend to be more stressed than people who don’t have this habit.

But why do we procrastinate? Despite knowing that they will probably be worse off after delaying their tasks, why do some people still procrastinate? Why would a married couple delay having a child? Why would a person not leave the job he hates? Why would others prefer to defer a difficult project and prioritise easier ones? It’s not that they are lazy or laid-back.

Research shows that procrastinators may actually dread failure. They may have a fear of success, an urge to be defiant, a perfectionist streak or a need to take risks. All these behaviours affect their ability to make decisions.

How about you? What triggers you to procrastinate? Check the following procrastination triggers and how you can address them.

Fear of failure

Fear of failure. We all have a bit of it. Who doesn’t want to fail? But if your fear of failure is so great that you no longer want to try new things anymore, procrastination becomes a big issue. Perhaps you hardly ever work out because you fear feeling so tired and worn out. Or you don’t apply for promotion because you fear getting rejected.

The next time you are faced with a difficult challenge, give yourself a chance to take the risk. Remember, getting something done is better than not doing anything at all. Who knows – it could take you to your dreams or unlock the door to new opportunities.

Cramming

Do you thrive on the excitement of scrambling to hit deadlines? Do you prefer staying awake for two consecutive nights just to finish off a report which you could have done earlier? The habit of cramming is one of the most common triggers of procrastination. You probably think there is plenty of time to do things so you just wait until you have very little time left.

If you think you’re at your best when under pressure, prove it. Do it hours before schedule, as you always do. Then, try doing the task ahead of time. You will most likely notice that your overall routine seems a little saner and that you have more free time on your hands when you knock stuff off early.

Additional Tips to Stop Procrastination

Start your day early.

Not only can you stretch your time by waking up early. But also, you get to enjoy quiet moments and have plenty of time reflecting and planning your daily routine. Starting your day early helps you concentrate on a few big tasks as soon as you get up and get a bunch of work done that would have taken many more hours during the bustle of the day.

Go to sleep early.

You can’t wake up early if you don’t go to sleep early. You need to recharge your batteries to sustain your daily activities. Exhaustion is definitely a motivator to keep procrastinating.

Don’t overwhelm yourself. Take easy on your to-do list.

Accomplishing tasks, no matter how small, gives you a higher sense of accomplishment – which in turn boosts your motivation to handle bigger tasks. Try starting with smaller tasks and reserve more of your energy on more difficult activities.

Think of an ominous task.

Think of something you really don’t want to do (.e.g. clean the attic, wash the dishes, or do the laundry). Soon you’ll find yourself doing what you really need to do because it’s better than the dreaded chore. You will also realise that even though some activities could be mundane, they are not really as bad as those chores you hate.

Set up daily reminders.

Whether it’s every 15 minutes, 30 minutes, or one hour – set up a reminder that you should be working on something and not wasting your time. You can also set up reminders that give you motivational quotes.

Make yourself accountable.

Give yourself the full responsibility of every task you handle. This ways, you are motivating yourself to push harder and give it your best. Consider announcing your change publicly. Be vocal about it. Hit the social networks, blog, write letters, and do whatever it takes to make yourself more accountable to getting work done.

Become mindful

Be aware of what you are doing. Don’t get mindlessly stuck on social networks and leisure activities that distract you and prevent you from getting more work done. And don’t forget to give yourself some quiet time. We are constantly plugged in to our digital world. It can be overwhelming and stressful. Give yourself at least 15 minutes of quiet every day to refocus and be with yourself.

Let me know which tricks work best for you,

Richard Scott
Clinical Hypnotherapist
http://www.greymatterz.co.uk

facebook.com/greymatterzhypnotherapy

Twitter: @RichGreymatterz

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7 ways to boost Self Esteem

February 25, 2014

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It can be really difficult to try lifting your self-esteem up during bad times – when you’re dealing with a disability, when you’re having a difficult time getting along with someone you care about, when you are being pushed to your limits at work, when you’re going through financial difficulties, and so on.

In times like these, all you can think to do is blame yourself for not being likeable, for not doing good enough, and for always failing.

You may even think of hurting yourself and giving up completely.

But in order to get through life’s adversities, self-esteem is of prime importance.

Below is a list of things you can do to raise your self-esteem.

You may notice that that along the way, your inner critical self will start to build resistance to prevent you from feeling better. But that’s okay.

Just carry on with your best efforts. Over time, you will find yourself feeling a lot better and more than capable of facing life’s challenges.

Treat yourself well.
Make it your daily goal to treat yourself well.

Take care of yourself by eating healthy foods, exercising regularly, and getting enough rest and sleep.

Avoid habits that could be detrimental to your health like smoking, excessive alcohol drinking, and negative thinking.

Talk to yourself in a polite way.
During tough times you might get caught up with the critical voices inside you saying “you are no better”, “you are a loser”, “you won’t ever get it right”, and so on.

Try not to get carried away with them. Instead, tell yourself “you can do this”, “you are smart”, and “you are capable of succeeding”.

Intentionally replace the negative thoughts with positive affirmations.

Spend time with friends and family.
Spend more time with people who treat you well and have genuine concern and care for you. Their support is vital to your self-esteem.

Avoid negative, difficult people who see nothing in you but your flaws. You don’t need them at this point in your life.

Start small.
Studies suggest that the small achievements we have can significantly boost our well-being and self-esteem.

As you look for the bigger outcome, be thankful of the little goals you have accomplished.

They will give you the confidence you need to survive a difficult challenge.

Forgive yourself.
If you didn’t make it this time, it’s okay. Don’t punish yourself for failing.

Don’t be too tough on yourself. Remember that mistakes are part of a successful journey as they give you an opportunity to expand your learning.

Forgiving yourself is a great way to raise your self-esteem rather than indulging in self-pity.

Don’t compare.
Comparing your life with that of other people and finding out that they excel in one area of life can further crash your self-esteem.

Comparing does not only make you feel unhappy. It is also unfair for that person, as you don’t know what they have gone through.

You are only seeing one aspect of their life. Instead of focusing on the success of others, you should try being better than you were yesterday.

Also, learn to accept yourself, including your limitations and weaknesses.

While there are things you can change, you also have to realise that there are things that you cannot change.

Loving yourself just the way you are is better you than hating yourself.

Do things you enjoy.
Don’t forget to give yourself a little downtime. You have been dealing with a lot of things in the past days, weeks or months.

You deserve to have a break. Do things that cheer you up, whether it’s baking, cooking, writing poems, sketching, or dancing.

Once you have restored, if not improved your self-esteem, you will find yourself effectively dealing with difficult situations you encounter in life.

I look forward to hearing your feedback,  let me know how successful these techniques were for you,  or please forward them onto to someone you may know that needs them.

Richard Scott
Clinical hypnotherapist
Www.greymatterz.co.uk

Mindful or Mind Full?

February 12, 2014

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The everyday stress, the challenges at work and the problems we are going through can all cause burnout, which in turn affects our mental health. And as you may well know, in times like this, it is very hard to concentrate and perform at your best.

Instead of being mindful, you tend to be “mind full”.

Whenever your head feels so heavy because a lot of ideas and thoughts go in and out, consider following these steps. They will not only help to clear your mind but also give you relief from stress, and help you regain some focus.

Write it down.

The best approach is not to get away from the problem, but face it courageously. Writing is a proven way to organise our thoughts. Adopt the habit of clearing your mind through writing. The more you try to ignore them, the more these thoughts will bug you. First off, get a pen and paper and go to a quiet place. Write down the thoughts that are bugging you – good or bad.

Don’t restrict yourself and don’t feel ashamed. Sometimes, we just can’t tell our brain what it should or should not think about. Create three columns and label them: “to be done”, “not now”, and “delete”. Sort your thoughts. Be honest and try to place each thought to the right column. You will realise that most of your thoughts can be deleted or can be put aside for now.

Sketch it.

Can’t write? Why not draw a picture? You probably have thoughts that can’t be described by words. You need not be an artist to draw. After all, your output is something you just have to keep for yourself. Just let your emotions and thoughts flow. You can create images, graphs or charts – whatever that best describes your thoughts. You don’t need to ask permission. Draw simple pictures of what’s on your mind.

Take deep breaths.

Deep breathing is a relaxation technique that is a great strategy for regaining your mental clarity. Deep breathing increases the oxygen levels in your body, which in turn benefits your brain.

Find someone to talk to.

Sometimes, we simply need a friend to clear our mind. You are probably confused of what decision to make, or unsure about a certain project or task you’re doing. That’s where a good friend comes in.

He or she can help you organise your thoughts effectively, and clear those unwanted thoughts. Sometimes, to clear our mind, we just need someone who will listen – someone who will listen to your hopes, fears, and questions without judgement.

Hang out with your furry friend.

There’s no scientific evidence showing that having a pet can help clear your mind. But there’s vast evidence suggesting that it can make your life better in many ways.

It eases your depression, lowers your blood pressure, boosts your mood, and helps you deal with stress better. If you are happier and healthier, you are in a better position to organise your thoughts easier.

Remind yourself of what’s more important to you.

Sometimes, our minds become flooded with lots of thoughts that are not really important. In times when your mind is full, it’s really helpful to try looking back on things that matter more to you. They may be your children, family, friends or loved ones, perhaps your job or even your goals in life.

Self Hypnosis / Meditation.

Mental clarity can be one simple step away. Consider making this mental practice a part of your daily routine. Afford yourself just 15 minutes or so, close your eyes and begin to focus on the following. Firstly pay attention to your breathing – try to slow it down. Now in your mind, visit a place you enjoy going to and make it all as real as possible.

Try to imagine the sights, the sounds, the smells, any tastes or sensations of touch. Give yourself a few moments to let all of these fantastic sensations soak into you. Take a few extra deep, slow breaths to lock in all of these sensations.

Now it’s time to return back to real-time and bring with you all of those good feelings ans sensations. Simply count yourself back to being fully awake by counting up the numbers from 1 to 5 and opening your eyes on number 5.

This exercise might be challenging at first but it gets easier and easier the more you do it. Go on, give it a try. Let me know how you get on.

Richard Scott
Clinical Hypnotherapist
http://www.greymatterz.co.uk

@RichGreymatterz

facebook.com/greymatterzhypnotherapy

Discover the secret to a happier 2014

January 8, 2014

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It’s the eighth day of January. How are your New Year’s resolutions going so far?

Quit smoking, lose weight, perhaps you’re aspiring to achieve better health and financial security this 2014, maybe you also want to aim for a happier and more fulfilling life. There’s no exact formula for happiness. It is a product of positive habits and traits that you should incorporate in your daily life.

So, to start your year right – with lots of positivity and cheer – here are some essential tips for you:

Replace negativity and complaints with gratitude.  Our brain has the natural tendency to favour bad thoughts than the positive ones. Experts call it the “negativity bias”. But if we are going to intentionally pay more attention to positive thoughts, we can be happier.

Research by Shelley Gable of the University of California, Los Angeles, and Jonathan Haidt of the University of Virginia suggests that we actually have three times more positive experiences than negative. Try replacing negativity and complaints with gratefulness. This is a good way to train your mind to become more optimistic.

Live in the present.

Avoid hyper-focusing on the future or the past. A large body of research suggests that mindfulness or awareness of the present moment, is one key to happiness.

Laugh more.

A lot of times, we take life too seriously. Try to inject silliness in your day to day experience. Whether it’s watching a funny movie or video clip or playing charades with your friends or kids, do something that makes you laugh.

Seek your passion.

No matter how busy you are with your work or personal obligations, make it a goal to purse things or hobbies that you are passionate about. Don’t frown if you still don’t know what it is, just give yourself more time to discover and explore.

Surround yourself with cheery individuals.

Happiness is contagious. This year, try to spend more time with positive people – those who can influence to change your thoughts positively. A 2013 study by Harvard University and University of California found that a friend who lives close to the happy person has a 25 per cent higher likelihood of becoming happy too.

Get inspired.

When you are inspired, you are able to do things with enthusiasm and zeal. Find inspiration and motivation from everything, from a quote you see on the internet to a lovely song or an advice from a friend.

Recognise and accept your emotions.

It’s normal to feel sad and down at times. You don’t have to deny or ignore these unwanted feelings. You actually have to recognise them to understand their causes. This way, you can focus on the situation with mental clarity and give yourself a chance to resolve your problems in a more effective way.

Replace self-criticism with self-compassion.

Self-criticism weakens you while self-compassion strengthens your resilience, happiness and productivity. Love yourself a little more. If there’s anyone who should love you first, it should be no other but you.

Invest in healthy relationships.

Relationships are at the heart of happiness. You can find happiness in the relationships you make with other people. This year, plan to spend more time cultivating friendships. Think about how you can be a true friend to your partner, to your kids and parents, to your colleagues and all others around you.

Hope these tips can contribute to a happier and more fulfilling year in your life.
Once again, happy New Year!

Richard Scott
Clinical Hypnotherapist

www.greymatterz.co.uk

Part of the Core Health Centre

Avoid overeating this festive season – Here’s how.

December 21, 2013

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Let’s face it – this time of the year is often centred on food.

There are special dinners and get-togethers everywhere. This is the time of the year when we get to enjoy great food and we have a very good excuse to indulge! But overeating during holidays leave many people feeling guilty, especially when they notice that they have actually gained a few pounds.

Well, this is really not too bad as long as we are able to get back on track next year and work out those excess fats. But if you are still concerned about gaining weight this holiday season, I have a number of tips for you. It is certainly possible that you enjoy and indulge without overeating… and feeling guilty!

Spare your tummy for the foods you really enjoy.

Don’t eat cookies and junk foods just because they are sitting there or because others are enjoying them. Unless you really want them, spare your tummy for other foods – those that you really love to indulge in. And because it’s holiday season, there are going to be endless buffets featuring tantalising foods. Forget about the rest and simply focus on the foods you want.

Choose a red plate.

In 2012, a group of German and Swiss researchers found that people who are given meals served on a red plate reduced their food intake by as much as 40 per cent. According to them, the colour red may work like a subtle stop signal – like a red traffic light – telling them not to overeat.

Eat healthy most of the time.

If you can’t resist the calorie-dense junk foods served in parties and get-togethers, try as much as possible to eat healthy when you’re at home. Replace those bags of cookies with fresh produce like fruits and vegetables and take those fizzy drinks from your fridge and replace them with smoothie drinks and other healthy beverages. This way, you won’t feel guilty whenever you indulge in not-so-healthy meals at holiday parties.

Watch your portions.

It’s perfectly okay to get some of this and some of that, as long as you are keeping an eye on your food portions. A great strategy is to get bigger portions of the healthy stuff and small portions of the calorie-dense, unhealthy food choices. And don’t forget to watch over the calories you are consuming from beverages. Commercial juice varieties, as well as some beers and spirits are very high in calories. What’s more, they contain large amounts of sugar too.

Drink plenty of water.

A glass of water before mealtime can reduce your hunger pangs or food cravings, making you less likely to overeat. It also helps prevent indigestion, which is common during the holiday season.

Stock up healthy snacks.

If you are going out of town for a vacation, pick up a few healthy snacks just as you would get some bottled water. This will prevent you from indulging in unhealthy snacks along the way.

Don’t skip breakfast.

Just because you will be attending a lunch party doesn’t mean you should forego breakfast. Eating a healthy, fulfilling meal in the morning could save you from a calorie splurge later in the day. Opt for protein-filled foods like lean chicken, hard-boiled egg, a slice or two of brown bread, and freshly squeezed orange juice.

Go easy at 6pm onwards.

Eating late on holidays is common. If you’re craving for pasta, rice and other calorie-dense meals, eat them at lunch. Enjoy fresh vegetable salad, sandwich and a glass of wine maybe for dinner.

Be alcohol savvy.

Alternate alcoholic drinks with water to avoid hangover and dehydration. You will also be reducing your calorie intake this way. Furthermore, try spirits with low-calorie mixers and don’t forget to “drink moderately”.

Drop the guilt.

It won’t help you with anything – it will just make you feel worse this holiday season. What’s more, new research from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand has found that people who felt guilty after overeating tend to gain more weight than those who didn’t feel guilty. The researchers emphasised that the diet controlling habit of guilt ridden-women gets abandoned once they are guilt ridden.

Hope you find these tips useful. Here’s wishing you a wonderful, delicious and fulfilling festive break!

Richard Scott
Clinical Hypnotherapist & Psychotherapist

www.greymatterz.co.uk

Part of the Core Health Centre

15 tips to a succesful marriage.

October 18, 2013
happy marriage

happy marriage

In her book “Marriage Rules: A Manual for the Married and the Coupled Up”, relationship expert Harriet Lerner, Ph.D., talks about the simple rules for a remarkable couple relationship:

Be appreciative.

Make at least two positive comments each day. Tell your partner what you admire most about him or her. It could be the delicious barbecue your wife prepared last night or the stunning appearance of your husband in his new shirt.

Lie low on criticism.

Criticisms appear to be more helpful in the beginning of a romantic relationship. But it gets annoying over time. Lie low on giving criticisms, especially those you have already pointed out in the past. Also let go of the unimportant negative remarks that can make your partner feel embarrassed or could reduce his or her confidence.

Give a little more time for yourself. Connect with your friends and family. Pursue your passion. Do things you enjoy. Being married doesn’t mean you have to let go of your individuality.  When your energy is directed to living your life in the best way you can, you don’t get to “over-focus” on your partner in a negative way.

Listen.

Sometimes, the most powerful way to connect and comfort a person is to say nothing but listen.

Take time to listen to them without interrupting, or giving judgements. Listen with an open mind and an open heart. It’s where understanding, empathy and communication starts.

Do it when you say you would.

Never think that your contributions to the relationship compensates for the things you have failed to do or the promises you have broken.

Don’t hesitate to say “I am sorry”.

Even if you know your fault constitutes only 20 per cent of the entire problem. Remember the fact remains that you also did something wrong (no matter how small or insignificant it is) so it is just proper to apologise. This will also encourage your partner to do the same.

Don’t demand an apology.

Just because he or she doesn’t say the magic words “I’m sorry” doesn’t mean your partner doesn’t want to reconcile with you. Some people say “sorry” through deeds rather than words. Be more sensitive towards your spouse’s way of communicating his or her feelings.

Say it short.

A distant partner may avoid conversations because it may feel ‘awful’ to him or her. So slow down your speech, lower your tone, and speak gently.

Stop the emotional pursuit.

The more you chase a distant partner, the farther he or she gets away. So focus more on living your life in the best way you can. A distant partner is more likely to move towards you when he or she sees you are taking good care of yourself.

Exit a conversation when you start to feel you are being hit “below the belt”. During a heated argument, it’s easy to get flown away by emotions and say words we don’t really mean. If your partner starts to become rude, tell your partner that you are going to stop the conversation until he or she is ready to talk to you calmly and with respect. Be firm.

Cultivate good family values.

Take time to assess your dysfunctional family patterns and make effort to change them for the better.

Turn your partner “on”.

If it’s your partner who always initiates sex, be the one to do it sometimes. This will make your spouse feel more appreciated and loved.

Pursue your own hobbies, wants and goals.

Take a dance or a baking class, travel with friends – cherish life outside your relationship. Keeping the balance between your married and personal life can reduce your stress levels and boost your well-being.

Set boundaries with technology use.

Technology is essential to our daily life but too much of it can affect the quality of our personal relationships. Agree on “time-out rules” where each one of you is prohibited from using mobile phone, computer or any gadget. These rules are best during mealtimes, at least an hour before bedtime, during intimate moments, vacation trips, and the like.

Be willing to compromise for your partner.

But not to the extent that your core values, beliefs, goals and priorities are compromised. Set limits and let your partner know about them.

There you go, sounds quite simple. Do let me know how you get on.

Richard Scott

Clinical Hypnotherapist / Psychotherapist

SNHS Dip.CH, SNHS Adv Dip.CH.Psy, PHPA, ICHM, NHSTA

GREY MATTERZ
Core Health Centre, 55 Beverley Road, Hull HU3 1XL

Hull Office:          01482 22 71 25
Or Mobile:           07843 012 712

Email: info@greymatterz.co.uk
Website: www.greymatterz.co.uk

How to train your BRAIN to perform Under Pressure

September 17, 2013
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3, 2 and 1 – your name has just been called and it’s time to perform.

There you are – standing on the stage, facing a crowd of people. Everyone’s looking at you, from head to foot. As you gaze at those strangers, you felt tension in your arms, neck, hands and all over your body. Everything moves like a slow motion movie. Yes, you are nervous. But the show must has to go on – you’re here to perform. So, what do you do…?

The Science behind ‘Grace under Pressure’

Everybody has the power to create a calm state of mind in order to deal with stress and pressure in an effective way. Studies on the human mind continue to prove that ‘grace under pressure’ is a skill that can be learned and applied in everyday life. And one way to elicit this special skill is to stimulate the vagus nerve.

The vagus never is known as the ‘wandering nerve’ because it has multiple branches that diverge from two thick stems rooted in the cerebellum and brainstem that travel or wander to the lowest viscera of your abdomen, touching your heart and most major organs along the way. When people say “trust your gut”, they are actually saying “trust your vagus nerve”.

The vagus nerve also plays an important role in your body’s ‘flight’ or ‘fight’ system. Signals from your conscious mind travel through the vagus nerve to tell your organs to create an inner-calm state so you can “rest-and-digest” during times of safety or prepare your body for action during dangerous situations.

The vagus nerve has the ability to slow your heart rate, lower your blood pressure and the activity in your other organs. But sometimes, the vagus nerve’s reflexive responses can backfire. Instead of keeping you calm and ‘in control’, it can intensify your body’s negative responses, making you feel overwhelmed, agitated, stressed and uneasy. You are also likely to experience undesirable physiological symptoms like racing heart, sweaty palms, dry mouth, upset stomach and shakiness.

But here’s the good news – you can actually stimulate your vagus nerve to elicit ‘grace under pressure’ and here’s how to do it:

Breathe, breathe and breathe.

You will be surprised of how a simple breathing technique, which involves repeatedly inhaling and exhaling deeply, can set your mind and body to succeed in a task. Deep diaphragmatic breathing is the key to stimulating the vagus nerve. This results to the slowing down of your heart rate and blood pressure, keeping you calm in times of performance anxiety.

Keep practising.

Your brain, particularly your cerebellum, has the power to store muscle memory, which gives you confidence to perform gracefully under pressure. Without prior preparation, we are forced to rely extensively on our pre-frontal cortex, which could get disengaged and hamper our performance.  So whatever it is – a posing routine, a song, a speech, a music recital, or a corporate presentation, don’t forget to rehearse. It really is helpful.

Match your skills with the challenge.

Creating a state of ‘flow’ involves matching your skill level with the challenge at hand. One good strategy to achieve this is to keep pushing yourself to the limits. Engage in activities that keep you nestled between anxiety and boredom and slowly move on to more challenging activities. This will keep your vagus nerve active but at the same time, not too exhausted.

Get moving.

Cardio-respiratory activities, including strength training and even yoga, stimulate your vagus nerve and harmonise hormones and neurotransmitters linked to ‘grace under pressure’. Exercising also helps steer your mind away from discouraging thoughts. At the same time, it boosts your mood which has a significant effect on your entire performance level.

Be careful who you stay with.

Prior a performance or presentation, stay away from anxious people. Like a cold, anxiety is contagious. The vagus nerve picks up on people’s vibe so if you’re with pessimistic individuals, you’re likely to think the way they do. If the situation doesn’t permit you to stay away from anxious people, engage in calming activities that distract your mind, like listening to music, practising those breathing techniques or even try a positive visualisation technique.

Practise compassion.

This may come as a surprise to you but compassion does have a good deal of benefits to helping you achieve grace under pressure. In a 2010 study published in the journal Psychological Science, researchers discovered a link between high vagal tone index and positive emotions, physical health and positive social connections. They also found that reflecting on positive social connections and working to improve them also caused improvements in vagal tone.

Cultivate optimism.

During stressful situations, you may hear your critical self, saying ‘you can’t do it’, ‘you’re going to fail’, and all other words of discouragement. That’s a normal mental response that is part of your brain’s survival instinct. But by generating positive emotions, you can direct your vagus nerve to work harmoniously with your mind and body to keep you calm and focused in the middle of any challenging task.

I often teach positive visualisation techniques to performers and sports people in order to enhance their abilities and reduce their stress levels. Please feel free to ask me further questions or advice.

Also, if YOU have any techniques which keep you motivated and focussed prior to a performance, please feel free to share them and help others.

I look forward to your thoughts.

Richard Scott
Clinical Hypnotherapist & Psychotherapist
greymatterz.co.uk

Part of the Core Health Centre